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Baby Carriers and Slings

My neighbor is an ex-hippie who used to carry her baby in one of the earliest papoose-style carriers rather than using a traditional carriage. People heaped abuse on her and told her that she was hurting her baby both psychologically and physically.

Those nosy parkers were wrong. People still feel apprehensive when it comes to placing a newborn in such a primitive means of transportation, but rest assured Lucy will be comfortable and safe in a baby carrier or a sling. Remember, she was tucked into a ball for nine months and survived it just fine. Her back is just as flexible, so there’s no reason to assume that after birth she’ll suddenly want to lounge in a carriage like an adult in a bed. She’ll be happy to be bundled up against you like in the good old days.

Baby-carrier labels advise caution for newborns lighter than eight pounds, not because of discomfort or possible back issues, but because a small baby can fall through the carrier’s side opening. If you choose to use a papoose-style carrier before your baby reaches eight pounds, make sure you adjust the straps properly. No matter the baby’s size, beware of her falling while you’re putting her in and taking her out of a sling.

These baby carriers aren’t just convenient; they’re also lifesavers during Lucy’s “cranky time,” when nothing but a rocking motion can calm her. And after Lucy outgrows her carrier, you can move her into a backpack-style carrier if you’re the hiking type.