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Burns

Most children get burned by accidentally touching something hot, like an iron or a radiator, or by accidental scalding. A burn will initially present as an area of redness. If it doesn’t blister within the next day it’s a first-degree burn. Pain medication is the only thing you need to administer—no ointment, no ice, nothing else.

If it does blister, it’s a second-degree burn, and while it’s probably still not a big problem (unless it’s on the fingers, face, or genitals), your doctor should look at anything more than simple redness. Second-degree burns expose the skin to infection as a result of blisters, so antibiotic cream should also be applied. If the burn is more severe and the deep tissues are affected, it’s an emergency.

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