a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
r
s
t
u
v
w
x














Eggs

For kids, eggs are fascinating objects, and they taste good too. But some adults don’t share this taste or fascination: They are wary of allergic reactions or intolerance to eggs [See: Food Reactions]. Of course, eggs, like any food, can cause allergies in rare instances. However, if your child were allergic to eggs, the reaction would be immediate and intense at the first ingestion, which would warn you to avoid eggs in the future. Sensitivity to eggs is more common, but the effects (such as hives) are relatively mild, and may not recur the next time your child eats an egg.

When can you introduce eggs to the diet? Opinions differ: Some people advise steering clear of eggs before the one-year mark, while other folks are anti yolk. Both ideas are unfounded myths. I have learned from experience that an egg—the whole thing as it occurs in nature—is perfectly healthy and can be served as early as solid food is introduced, around six months. If Lucy turns out to be allergic to eggs, the timing of introduction won’t make a difference, and delaying exposure won’t prevent the allergy. As for egg sensitivities, they are rare and mild enough not to discourage you from sharing your brunch with her.

Eggs are excellent for older kids too. Given regularly, even once a day, they are a good source of protein and calories. They’re high in cholesterol, but children, unlike adults, are active enough to use this form of fat as a source of calories without it clogging their arteries. That said, even kids shouldn’t eat eggs too often. Any diet that relies too heavily on one food sacrifices variety and balance.